Aggression Case Study : Communication in Dog Training

If your dog is exhibiting unwanted behavior, it is your responsibility, as the owner, to change it. Three Rivers Dog Training can show you how!

Oftentimes, dog owners are under the misconception that their dogs live to please them. In fact, dogs are usually out to please themselves.

This isn’t to say your dog is selfish or incapable of love or anything like that–it simply means they don’t view or feel things exactly the way we do. If your dog has a behavioral problem and you never address it, your dog will think everything is hunky dory. They are doing what they want, they’re happy, and they don’t know that you’re unhappy. If you are unhappy with your dog’s behavior and you’ve tried to show it with no response, you might just not be communicating effectively with your dog. This is where professional dog training can help!

I recently worked with an aggressive dog named Buddy whose owner had concerns, and rightfully so, that he might lash out and do some real harm. Buddy would growl when someone touched his food, touched his ears, touched his paws, gave a command…pretty much anytime someone interacted with him. His owners tried keeping his behavior under control, but because they couldn’t get through to him, he was able to just ignore them and continue doing what he wanted to do. He didn’t know anything else.

When dog training programs discuss establishing the owner as the leader, this is what we mean–letting your dog know that you are in charge and they need to cut out the bad behavior. I achieved this for Buddy’s owners using a unique combination of tried and true training techniques like the elimination of roaming, proper leash handling techniques, and basic obedience training.

By preventing Buddy from having the run of the house, it forced him to be dependent on his owners for food, water, and time outside. When someone is in charge of vital parts of your life, you listen to them. Obviously, Buddy’s parents had attempted basic obedience training, but it didn’t stick. By using proper leash handling techniques in conjunction with basic obedience training, we were able to communicated with Buddy through body language and verbal language, making it easier for him to understand exactly what was expected of him.

Buddy’s behavior has already improved tremendously. I can now approach him without fear of being attacked, and his owners can move his toys and food bowl without having to worry about his aggression. If he does growl, they know how to correct the behavior.

To schedule your in-home consultation and learn how I can help your dog achieve similar results, give me a call at 800.649.7297 or send us an email. Change is possible.